Go ahead and get your hands dirty!

Go ahead and get your hands dirty!

Go ahead, spend time outside in nature. With spring stirring, find ways to add nature to your life. 17-2

Here are some ideas:

  • Look at the sky from wherever you are. Sneak out of the office occasionally and find a window if you don’t have one.
  • Grow food. An herb plant can grow on a window sill, a potato plant can grow in a bale of straw … find an option that works for you.
  • Pick out a favorite tree to adopt for the season. Visit it often and make it feel loved.
  • Change the scope of your perception with a magnifying glass or binoculars.
  • Plan a night adventure. Night hikes or canoe tours can be found or requested from your local parks and recreation department.

We’ve got just the thing to clean you up after a satisfying session outside. Whether you are clearing away debris or building up the soil for new plantings, Lady Scrubbins gardening soap can scrub you clean. Our gardening soap is made with cornmeal from the Old Mill of Guilford. The cornmeal offers scrubbing power, and we’ve blended oils of sweet basil, lemon, and eucalyptus to clean and freshen your skin. The end result is both healthy and sustainable for all of us.

Fun fact about our name

Fun fact about our name

gardensoap 001 This is a loaf of our gardener’s soap. You can see the cornmeal grains throughout, and the geometric pattern that Gerald created on the top of the loaf.

The loaf is created by pouring the soap mixture, which has a consistency like pudding, into a mold. About a day later, the soap is hard enough to cut into bars. Once that is done, the bars are set aside on trays to cure for about eight weeks. During that time, the sodium hydroxide (lye) saponifies, or turns the mixture into soap.

Regarding the name “Lady Scrubbins,” here is a quote from Elizabeth Cunningham’s book, The Return of the Goddess. Her info is valid–I’ve confirmed it with the Oxford English Dictionary.

Lady comes from the Old English hlaefdige, kneader of bread. Dheigh is Germanic in origin and refers to kneading clay. Now some people insist that the derivation is from Middle English lafdi, the di, derived from Latin, meaning to give loaves. In either event, there is agreement in associating the word with bread, the staff of life. The Lady of the Manor, then, was the source of bread, the one who made it and distributed it. The loaf giver, which is almost to say, the life giver.